Shared Roses Shared Stories: on Healing History

by Canadian Author, Researcher, Explorer, Producer
Rolf A. F. Witzsche

 

Healing history won't change the past 
but it will change the future

 

A sequence of stories is presented here that is of a part of Chapter 13 (Shared Roses) of the novel Roses at Dawn in an Ice Age World, of the epic series of novels, The lodging for the Rose. The full chapter is also available in video form.

With the mall and its wide open spaces now behind us, and its frame of the brooding presence of government structures surrounding it, receding into the distance, the unfolding scene became 'smaller,' the streets narrower, the houses drabber, except in the brightly lit streets that appeared like rivers of commerce in some places. We mixed with the flow of those rivers, amidst crowds that moved about, apparently without aim or a purpose. Myriad forms of advertising cried out, aiming to capitalize on the aimless wanderers' apparent lack of purpose, each of the displays of 'commerce' suggesting in bright colors their own purpose as being something vital and irresistible, a must have for the aimless. Apparently they succeeded, like fishermen do by the river, dangling their worms and shiny reflectors before the fish, which likewise seem to float about without a purpose that they are conscious of. A few of the commercial establishments dangled their lures in great designs that displayed the word "Palace." There was Aladdin's Palace across the street, a building of an oriental design, bathed in pink light. It seemed to be a club of sorts. One of the names of the commercial palaces started with the word, "Temple," written in huge letters. It seemed that the 'fish' in these nightly rivers of commerce came with an apparent disadvantage that the fish in the real rivers didn't have. Sylvia pointed this out to me when we came closer to the "Temple," a place that advertised itself amidst colorful scenes, as the "Temple of Unrequited Love."

"What do you suppose that means?" she asked.

"Well, it could be a bar, a dance hall, a strip joint, a theatre, anything of the kind that capitalizes on a human condition, that the fish in the Potomac River would know nothing about."

"It might be a temple dedicated to the poverty of the rich," said Sylvia, and began to laugh.






"Or it's a temple dedicated to the poverty of the impotent?" I added.

I told Sylvia Erica's story that takes the concept several steps farther. I told her that Erica was abducted one dark night after an evening class at the university in Leipzig. A man had followed her. He had forced her into a building that he apparently knew would be empty. She decided that it might be too dangerous to fight the man off, while it would cost her far less to let him have what he obviously needed. She told me, that at first the man had covered her mouth so that she couldn't scream, and then when she didn't struggle to fight him off, he covered her mouth with his lips to steal a kiss, which she let him have willingly. That's when she felt him 'explode' in his pants, by which the tensions suddenly drained away.

He apologized to her profusely. He even asked her for a date, before he walked away, which she refused of course. However, she felt ashamed afterwards about her refusal to fulfill an apparent deep unfulfilled need. She had replied to him that he was an intelligent person and should therefore be able to establish many friendships with many women. His response had been that he had found only closed doors. She felt sad for him afterwards, being alone again, while she waited at the streetcar stop.

She had told me that she felt sad that society had become so poor in its games, that this man went starving amidst a sea of plenty. But mostly she felt sad and ashamed of herself that she found herself no different than the rest of society. Why couldn't she have offered the man a date in a public place for a cup of coffee and a chat? She was ashamed suddenly, at realizing how little this gesture would have cost her, and how much it would have meant to him as an acknowledgement of him as a human being. It might have given him the courage not to give up hope.



"That's quite a story," said Sylvia. "That really happened?"

"Apparently so," I replied. "I'm sure she didn't make this up. No one would invent such an unbelievable story."

"But Peter, that's a story about pity, not love. Aren't pity and love contradictory terms? One can't really love out of pity, can one?"

"Isn't that a bit like asking why elephants fly?" I said to her. "I think the distinction that you are referring to between pity and love is invalid. Elephants don't fly. This fact makes that question invalid, just as is yours. If Erica had not been moved by a deeply rooted sense of love for a fellow human being, and had not felt him worthy to be enveloped in love as a human being, for what reason then would she have agonized over that incidence, and her inability to respond with a loving gesture? Isn't that what the man had really asked for? She realized afterwards that she would have enjoyed responding in such a loving manner, and would have found it enriching. And what about the man? Why should his love, that had been starved, that had been countered with so many closed doors to make him as desperate as he became, not have been nourished by her? I think this is what Erica had been asking herself. Maybe the Temple offers an answer to this question."

"Why don't we go in and see what the 'Temple of Unrequited Love' has in store for us?" said Sylvia.

"It probably has no bearing on Erica's case," I said, but I agreed that it was intriguing. It seemed to be a place for dancing. I saw pictures of a dance floor and a band in one of the display windows. Thus, arm in arm, we lined up at the Temple's entrance. The cover charge of five dollars each promised live music. More enticing, however, was the inscription on a banner that loomed at the rear wall above another gallery of photographs. The banner was strung high above the two doorways that were the entrances to the dance hall.

"Please dance with a stranger," was printed in silver letters on a wide red band. No one could not have seen the banner and its message, that had been strung across the wall from corner to corner as if it were a condition for entering.

Surprisingly, the place was crowded, considering that we came quite early in the evening. Half the space in the hall was devoted to the dance floor and the band, with a sea of small tables and chairs surrounding the main attraction. Actually, the main attraction were the people themselves. We found a tiny table in an obscure corner of the place, but we barely got there when Sylvia became the attraction for a neatly dressed Spanish looking man. "May I have the honor to dance with the lady?" he said to both of us and bowed to Sylvia. Sylvia said yes and smiled and followed the man. 

Before I realized what happened I was invited too. Seconds later I found myself on the dance floor facing a total stranger, but she wasn't like a stranger at all. We were moving with the music in a flow of rhythms and gestures and sounds that became our dance, and she and I became one with the flow of the music and the center of it, so it seemed.

The woman who invited me was rather ordinary looking in the general sense, but looking closely, I noticed a faint familiarity in the features of her face, that reminded me of the fabled Odo from a TV fantasy situated at a remote outpost at the edge of civilized space. As the dance progressed the familiarity broadened. But there the familiarity ended. Her moves, her reactions to the music, her faint shy smile and secret smug grin of satisfaction in the enjoyment of the dance, were far from ordinary and familiar. They mirrored in many ways my own responses in the 'whirlwind' of the dance, which seemed all new.

She was of a freckled complexion that suited her well in the way she was dressed. Nor did she try to hide the fact that the freckles extended deep down on her breasts. To the contrary, her deep cut dress was not designed to hide anything. She was proud to be herself just the way she was, and stood tall with her red-brown hair tied high, rather than it hanging down loosely. She had a faintly exotic, Hungarian, and down to earth kind of look about her. She became a puzzle in that sense that became constantly more complex and intriguing.

I felt lucky to be in a dance with her that made it quite acceptable from me to 'drink in' that wonderful sight before me, with looks that might otherwise be construed as staring. Dancing allows this deeper inward looking with an unfolding embrace of her, that was constantly broadening. It struck me that this is what the dance might have been intended to evoke, breaking the barriers of the universal apartheid of so-called civility. 

It seemed to me in the flow of the dance, that the 'deeper' I looked, the more I found an echo of myself unfolding in her, an echo of our common humanity in which we stand side by side with one-another as human beings, so that I found myself enriched by her expression of it. For a moment I dreaded the thought that the dance would end, after which the normal apartheid would resume that covers so much of the world's social scene.

I wondered, while we danced, whether the universal apartheid, that made no sense at this moment, had been invented in distant ages in order to prevent this kind of echo of ourselves in the flow of 'touching' one-another, and in the deep satisfaction that it stirs within the sense of wonder, which is resulting in the profound realization that we do indeed all stand side by side as human beings. The broader unfolding of this realization would have endangered any imperial structure. It seemed to me that the death penalty had been needed in ancient times to enforce the apartheid in its early stages. It seemed to me that the death penalty was later relaxed when the apartheid had become self-enforcing in countless different ways, just as the Brahmanic genocide became apparently a self-enforcing impetus in distant ages, in India.

The woman who I danced with, told me between songs that her name is Maria-Ilona. She invited me to continue to dance with her for a few more songs. I told her my name with a smile, and assured her that one more dance would be "heaven," and then another, and still another, and that they would cement that heaven in place in my memories. Her smile, in reply, lit up the dim of the dance floor.

It seemed to me that our dancing was happening not on a dance floor, really, but in Helen's lateral lattice of human hearts, all linked to one-another by strands of love, through which we find a reflection of ourselves in one-another, as we share a common universal humanity, and a common universal human Soul, that come to light in us in our unique individuality. It seemed as if the flow of our dancing was carrying us ever deeper into an aimless exploration of ourselves in the flow of the light of these fibers of love of the lateral lattice.

At the end of the sixth dance we returned to the little table to where Sylvia and the Spanish man, who gave his name as Alejo, had just come back to, themselves, equally as exhausted as we were.

"That's the trouble with this place," Alejo commented. "It wears a fellow out." He suggested that we might all find the atmosphere more relaxing at "Aladdin's Palace" down the street, where the music is quiet, and the atmosphere more intimate, and conducive for conversation. We all simply nodded.



Alejo was right, Aladdin's Palace was quiet. What the Temple of Unrequited Love lacked on decor, Aladdin's Palace had in abundance. We entered an oriental world that spoke of a thousand tales of sun drenched deserts, gilded palaces, snake charmers, pirates selling priceless treasures for a song amidst adventures in silk, interwoven with images of flying carpets. The music fitted the atmosphere created by the decoration. It took one out of the present into a magical realm of a distant age, that existed only in the shadows of imaginary tales. The drinks, though, were from the present world. Still, the Grand Marnier seemed exotic enough to apply to both worlds.

"Let me tell you a tale," said Sylvia, "in which the kind of dancing that I had experienced here, would have made a world of a difference."

Maria-Ilona suggested that the place we were in, was perfect for storytelling.

Alejo agreed.

So it was that Sylvia leaned back, and began by saying that her story appeared to have been from an equally distant age, though she had heard the story being told quite recently in a theatre in China. She said that the story had come to mind while she and Alejo were dancing. She said that her tale is about a tragedy that resulted from the lack of a wider vision and has something to do with one being able to see both sides of a coin, before its face value can be determined.

"That's the issue here in our present world," she said, "isn't it?" She added that this is something that very few people are able to do, or do well. She said, the tale has something to do with that, and with the goodness of living and its fragility.

She told us the story. -- The tale is that of a woman who had married a princely man, both by stature and by intelligence, and also by his manly looks and strength. But the man was not a prince. He was a soldier, and as a soldier he was killed in war, like many others, in countless wars. However, the woman who mourned for him, carried their child. In time the child was born and grew up in her arms and became a beautiful boy, wrapped in the tenderness of her care and her love.

As the boy grew older, he displayed evermore of the attributes of his father, so that the woman's love for him became the very reason for her living. She longed for no other love. Her life was fulfilled in the happiness of those years.

Then came the years of famine. The boy was twelve. A great migration began that many people undertook in the hope that they might escape the worst of the famine. She and her son were among them. One day, in the throng of the escape, her son was stolen from her side. Many children were stolen in those days, to become laborers for somebody else.

Grief-stricken to the deepest recesses of her soul, the woman refused to marry again. She had many suitors, since she was attractive as a person and still young, but her heart was too heavy with grief and fear. She feared that she would not survive another lost love. She felt it would be better not to love again, than having to bear the pain of loosing once more all that she had lived for. Instead of marrying, she made it her quest to find her lost boy.

As the years passed, however, her fading hope weakened her heart. She became more and more hateful and trusted no one. She hated especially the people who stole. Unfortunately, as the times were hard, many people resorted to stealing from one-another. Indeed, she herself had suffered hunger on several occasions, when thieves had broken into her home and had stolen her living.

As time went by the villagers set up patrols to protect themselves from the thieves, nor did they deal kindly with whoever got caught. One day, the woman herself encountered a thief. She confronted the man on the spot, right in her own cottage. She screamed at him, but realized there was no one nearby to offer her help. Without wasting a moment, she confronted the man in a rage of up-welling anger, and grasped a knife and thrust it in him without thinking. It all happened in a flash of a whirlwind of uncontrollable emotions. Moments later the man lay on the floor in pain, grasping at his stomach, gasping for air, asking her for forgiveness. As she kneeled down to him she noticed a birthmark under his left ear, that identified him as her son. She saw the birthmark as she lifted his head off the floor to give him a cup of water, which he had requested. The birthmark was uncommon. It was the same as that of her son. She embraced her son while he died. She knew she would have embraced him for his whole life, even as a thief. She would have cried for him, and let her love heal him. Now she could cry no more.

"How would the dancing have made a difference in that story?" asked Alejo, after a few moments of silence.

"No!" said Sylvia. "I won't tell you how it would make a difference. You have it within you to know that answer yourself. So, let me challenge you to tell it to me." 

"Unconditional, universal love is not an easy thing," commented Maria-Ilona. "We may never pass the test. This means we must be patient and gentle with one-another if we fail." I nodded, and hugged her for the answer.

In order to give Alejo some time to respond to Sylvia, I told everybody that I had a story of my own to tell. I had heard the story told in Baghdad. It's from a time long before the Caliphates came to be, and from before the great empires that preceded them. From this distant time, a story is kept alive about one of the early kings.

Among the families of the kings was a wise prince, who in time became king himself. As king, he ruled in an oppressed kingdom that was kept under the thumb of the mightiest empire in that region. But even while still being a prince, the royal heir developed a great love for his kingdom and his people. His love was such that it had also inspired his people's love for one-another. Later, after he became the ruler of the land, he hired the best poets and musicians that he could find, to compose songs of love with such purity and power, as would be needed to inspire a revolution for the freedom of the kingdom from its imperial oppressor.

It turned out that the revolution succeeded. The people became free. Except, in the euphoria of their freedom, the songs of love that had inspired them to grasp their freedom, had drifted into the background, and soon vanished from sight, and from their mind. Other songs, songs of greed, replaced them. In their greed, the people became oppressors themselves, of one-another, and this in more cruel ways, than the imperial oppressors had oppressed them before.

It was in this period of darkness, that a holy man started to sing the old songs again before the king. He sang them without a comment, and without a prayer, as none of these were needed since the king understood the message of the holy person. But who of the people of the kingdom would sing those songs again? The king asked the holy man. He received no answer. He longed to know, if it was possible once more, for anyone in the kingdom to inspire the people with songs of love for freedom, in the darkness of their deepest depression, when the darkness of their depression was so deep, that it was deemed to be light, and freedom.

The king received no answer to his questions. He determined that new songs should be written, but who of his people could write such songs in the darkness of the perversion that the people considered a panacea?

As it turned out, the king never found the answer to his puzzle. He died shortly thereafter, by the sword of an assassin. The king took the puzzle with him to his grave.

The question, thus, remains still to be answered.



"Shall the same be said of us?" said Sylvia.

"Perhaps it was too late in the story, to write the new songs, after the perversion had gone too deep," I replied. "Perhaps those new songs should have been written at the moment of victory, that gave the kingdom its freedom. The new songs, then, should have raised the curtain still higher, to inspire bonds of love, in which people reach out to enrich one-another's life. Maybe there comes a point when it is too late to compose those songs and to sing them. Maybe it is too late for us too, to do the same today in our world, as we face the gravest crisis in history. Still, we must not give up hope. There always remains some hope, if we uplift ourselves high enough, because the principles for gaining freedom and building a bright New World, are forever the same, from the beginning of time and for evermore, waiting to be discovered and to be applied. They are as valid today as they have been for all times. Whatever human breakthroughs we expect to be possible in the future, will be possible there, because they were possible in the past. And so they are possible now."

"This means that your story too, needs to be rewritten," said Maria-Ilona.

I nodded, and told everyone still another story, to give us time to rewrite the endings that need to be rewritten.



I told the story of a king, whose people had become enslaved in another kingdom. They became enslaved in the very kingdom in which they had found refuge in earlier times, when a great famine had parched their land. As guests, they were honored at first, but soon they became slaves, and becoming slaves, they were badly treated, especially in later years. Because of their now endless anguish, their own king found a way to free them from the land of their enslavers.

By his wisdom, diplomacy, and spiritual leadership, a great exodus was arranged. However, as the people left the land of their enslavers, on the way out, they began to riot and liberally loot their previous host to the point, that they now possessed great properties in gold and jewels.

As one might expect, they became corrupted by their golden properties. They created idols of gold. And as the idols grew their humanity became lost. They became worse than their masters had been. As a consequence, the king who had rescued them, led them deep into a desert and kept them there for thirty years, until the older generation had all died, whose property ideology had prevented the people from forming a viable new nation. Only after the purge was complete, were the people allowed to go on and become a nation.



"That's the story of the Israelis," said Sylvia.

"If you refer to the State of Israel, the answer is no," I said to her. "If the state of Israel continues to pursue the path it has chosen, which is in some ways worse than that of their former oppressors, the state of Israel will destroy itself and its people with it. However, this is not what my story is about. My story is that of the Israelite's exit from Egypt, in ancient times. The king is Moses. According to Scriptures, Moses kept the Israelites in a desert for thirty years, or thirty days, until the corrupted people had died, for the reason that the story explained. Apparently the people had corrupted themselves too deeply for any practical redemption to be possible."

Sylvia nodded her head. "That's the challenge we face today, isn't it?" she asked. "We must ask ourselves if we are not already beyond the point of no return, in our nuclear armed world, wrecked with insanity, and mired in reductionist thinking, for any practical redemption to happen that would allow us to create an new renaissance, or even an Ice Age Renaissance."

I explained the Ice Age Renaissance part.



"What do you think, Peter?" asked Maria-Ilona when I finished talking. "Has today's society already regressed beyond the point of any hope of becoming human again?"

I suggested that this question needs to be asked again and again. I suggested however, that we have the tools today, mental tools, the likes of which hadn't been developed in Moses' time. "We have the scientific intellectual tradition of 2,500 years of humanist development to support us, with principles established that Moses might not even have dreamed of. By utilizing the best of this tradition, society becomes indeed redeemable."

"Just look at us today," said Sylvia. "Peter and I have come to realize that two opposite models exist for people relating to one-another, which we have recognized as a vertical and a lateral model. This world of two opposite models for relating to one-another, reflects itself in the existence of also two opposite models for marriage. As a society we have lived under an imperial vertical or hierarchical model for centuries. We have built on this model a hierarchical society. We have recognized this model to be imperial and fascist in nature, as it was required for supporting a hierarchical society. The present marriage doctrine was developed under this vertical model that evidently precedes Moses. This model isolates and divides society universally into the smallest possible spheres, and creates an environment of tension. It represents all the features of the imperial vertical model. It renders the human being small, weak, even evil and impotent, and of such a low quality that society is deemed to be in need to be ruled over by a superior sovereign, or an elite authority such as the church. This imperial vertical-model reflects itself in a marriage model that is extremely small and confined, encumbered with ironclad limits, supposedly to confine the evil tendency of the human being, within the smallest sphere of private living, especially in the sexual domain. By this process the whole of society became fractured, privatized, and isolated. That has been done so that society won't interfere with the hierarchical system, but becomes a part of it. That is what we see today on the political horizon. However, the entire imperial vertical model, and the mythology that it rests on, is a perversion of what is true about the human being and our humanity. The natural model for mankind relating to one-another, reflects a society of human beings existing laterally side by side, and by no means as little entities. In the lateral model we discover ourselves as the tallest species of life in the Universe, endowed with incredible capacities and potential for good in our self-development. By this natural lateral model, each human being comes to light like a sun, with incredible brilliance, enriching the Universe with light and life."

"I see what you are getting at," said Maria-Ilona. "If we live by the lateral model, then our love for one-another doesn't unfold with the kind of the gravity of a black hole in space, as it does in today's world, and as it did in Moses' world. Instead, our love radiates outward from its infinite base, enveloping the Universe. That's something that Moses probably wasn't aware of, as being possible to happen, and few today are. With that kind of love we can win our peace and freedom in today's precarious world, that is identical to the one that Moses once faced, and for the same reason. Therefore, our solution is also the solution for the Moses story. That is how we would rewrite this story from a scientific standpoint."

I applauded her. "That is also how we save civilization and mankind from an Ice Age collapse," I added. "We don't have the option today that Moses applied, to purge the corruption from society by letting the people die with it. The Ice Age is too close. We are running out of time already. We need to commit ourselves to a hundred years scientific, technological, and economic development cycle, as a means for maintaining the global food supply in indoors facilities. If this development is delayed, while we wait for corruption to die out with the death of a corrupt society, the Ice Age might overwhelm us before we are ready. We need to start the Ice Age Renaissance now."

Alejo just shook his head.

"I know what you are thinking," said Sylvia. "Forget global warming. The Global Warming Doctrine is a scientific fraud designed to hide the fact that we face the return of the Ice Age within a hundred years or slightly more. The imperial goal is to prevent the necessary Ice Age Renaissance, in which no empire would survive. They would sooner incur the destruction of nine-tenth of mankind, than let their imperial status become endangered. They own us, lock, stock, and barrel, just as the kings of old owned those people. But Alejo, I think we can foil their game this time, and save mankind from an otherwise certain doom. Pete and I are committed to that." 

"Are you saying that this lateral model for human relationships, in which we all stand laterally side by side, also reflects itself in a corresponding marriage model?" interrupted Maria-Ilona and hugged me.

"The Principle of Universal Love doesn't eradicate the marriage concept, as one might expect," I said to Maria-Ilona. "It doesn't destroy anything. It uplifts the marriage concept and makes it all-inclusive, or at least more inclusive. Only the ironclad boundaries fall away, which presently isolate us from one-another universally. If we make an effort to allow ourselves to live like human beings in full acknowledgement of our common humanity, and our common universal divine Soul, then we have nothing to hide and to confine, for which boundaries would be needed. In this lateral universal context, the marriage model represents an infinite and progressive idea, a seed kernel for human development, and the boundless embrace of the whole of humanity. It becomes universal in scope. It becomes a universal marriage."

"It is no longer inward looking then, like a black hole that draws everything unto itself, as in today's world of universal privatization," replied Maria-Ilona. "Universal love and universal privatization are opposites by intent, aren't they?"

The concept of marriage, as universal marriage, reflecting the Principle of Universal Love, appears to be designed to function like a sun," said Sylvia. "It is designed to envelop the Universe with light and with the warmth of our love for our universal humanity. It becomes out-flowing and ever expanding. I see a universal marriage unfolding where the specific form of a people's relationship to one-another no longer matters, where the form of relationships gives way to the principles of respect for one-another as human beings, to honor kindness, generosity, and love in its highest sense, to uplift civilization and make the world in which we live a richer and brighter place."

"Are you saying that by embracing this natural universal marriage platform, we can step away from the threshold of no return and find a way to rescue our civilization?" Alejo replied. "We could have an accidentally unfolding nuclear war tomorrow."

"I think that would be the doom of mankind for all times to come," I interjected, "as it would destroy the chief resource for our needed Ice Age Renaissance. A large, highly developed, and economically well functioning society is required for starting that renaissance. If this resource is destroyed, it's game over for mankind. We are certainly justified to call today's preparation for nuclear war, suicidal insanity. Unfortunately, nuclear war is what society is after. We are like the people in the kingdom who thought that their darkness is light, and their self-enslavement is the mark of freedom." 

"The Cold War has been well named," said Maria-Ilona. "We have become stone cold towards one-another, and ourselves as a society that calls itself human beings. But how do we change the ending of Peter's story of the king who saw no hope, and could find no one to write the new songs of love and freedom that needed to be written? Considering how precarious our present world situation is, we might have already stepped past the point of no return to where a rescue of ourselves is no longer possible."

I told everybody that this very question about the threshold of no return had already been asked in ancient times. One finds traces of it in the earliest Scriptures. I referred to the Abraham story in which Abraham argued this very point in a dialog with God. The argument was about the impending destruction of the cities of Sodom and Gomorra. God suggested to Abraham that if fifty 'righteous' people could be found in these cities, the cities and the societies in them would survive. Abraham wasn't that optimistic. He suggested to God, that if perhaps only twenty upright people were to be found, would that not suffice? God agreed that this might be sufficient. Abraham asked again, what if there were only ten? God agreed again that this might possibly suffice. As it was, those ten didn't exist and the cities were self-destroyed. The societies within them had lost their conditioning to survive.

"Just look at us today," said Sylvia. "Peter and I have come to realize that two opposite models exist for people relating to one-another, which we have recognized as a vertical and a lateral model. This world of two opposite models for relating to one-another, reflects itself in the existence of also two opposite models for marriage. As a society we have lived under an imperial vertical or hierarchical model for centuries. We have built on this model a hierarchical society. We have recognized this model to be imperial and fascist in nature, as it was required for supporting a hierarchical society. The present marriage doctrine was developed under this vertical model that evidently precedes Moses. This model isolates and divides society universally into the smallest possible spheres, and creates an environment of tension. It represents all the features of the imperial vertical model. It renders the human being small, weak, even evil and impotent, and of such a low quality that society is deemed to be in need to be ruled over by a superior sovereign, or an elite authority such as the church. This imperial vertical-model reflects itself in a marriage model that is extremely small and confined, encumbered with ironclad limits, supposedly to confine the evil tendency of the human being, within the smallest sphere of private living, especially in the sexual domain. By this process the whole of society became fractured, privatized, and isolated. That has been done so that society won't interfere with the hierarchical system, but becomes a part of it. That is what we see today on the political horizon. However, the entire imperial vertical model, and the mythology that it rests on, is a perversion of what is true about the human being and our humanity. The natural model for mankind relating to one-another, reflects a society of human beings existing laterally side by side, and by no means as little entities. In the lateral model we discover ourselves as the tallest species of life in the Universe, endowed with incredible capacities and potential for good in our self-development. By this natural lateral model, each human being comes to light like a sun, with incredible brilliance, enriching the Universe with light and life."

"I see what you are getting at," said Maria-Ilona. "If we live by the lateral model, then our love for one-another doesn't unfold with the kind of the gravity of a black hole in space, as it does in today's world, and as it did in Moses' world. Instead, our love radiates outward from its infinite base, enveloping the Universe. That's something that Moses probably wasn't aware of, as being possible to happen, and few today are. With that kind of love we can win our peace and freedom in today's precarious world, that is identical to the one that Moses once faced, and for the same reason. Therefore, our solution is also the solution for the Moses story. That is how we would rewrite this story from a scientific standpoint."

I applauded her. "That is also how we save civilization and mankind from an Ice Age collapse," I added. "We don't have the option today that Moses applied, to purge the corruption from society by letting the people die with it. The Ice Age is too close. We are running out of time already. We need to commit ourselves to a hundred years scientific, technological, and economic development cycle, as a means for maintaining the global food supply in indoors facilities. If this development is delayed, while we wait for corruption to die out with the death of a corrupt society, the Ice Age might overwhelm us before we are ready. We need to start the Ice Age Renaissance now."

Alejo just shook his head.

"I know what you are thinking," said Sylvia. "Forget global warming. The Global Warming Doctrine is a scientific fraud designed to hide the fact that we face the return of the Ice Age within a hundred years or slightly more. The imperial goal is to prevent the necessary Ice Age Renaissance, in which no empire would survive. They would sooner incur the destruction of nine-tenth of mankind, than let their imperial status become endangered. They own us, lock, stock, and barrel, just as the kings of old owned those people. But Alejo, I think we can foil their game this time, and save mankind from an otherwise certain doom. Pete and I are committed to that." 

"Are you saying that this lateral model for human relationships, in which we all stand laterally side by side, also reflects itself in a corresponding marriage model?" interrupted Maria-Ilona and hugged me.

"The Principle of Universal Love doesn't eradicate the marriage concept, as one might expect," I said to Maria-Ilona. "It doesn't destroy anything. It uplifts the marriage concept and makes it all-inclusive, or at least more inclusive. Only the ironclad boundaries fall away, which presently isolate us from one-another universally. If we make an effort to allow ourselves to live like human beings in full acknowledgement of our common humanity, and our common universal divine Soul, then we have nothing to hide and to confine, for which boundaries would be needed. In this lateral universal context, the marriage model represents an infinite and progressive idea, a seed kernel for human development, and the boundless embrace of the whole of humanity. It becomes universal in scope. It becomes a universal marriage."

"It is no longer inward looking then, like a black hole that draws everything unto itself, as in today's world of universal privatization," replied Maria-Ilona. "Universal love and universal privatization are opposites by intent, aren't they?"

The concept of marriage, as universal marriage, reflecting the Principle of Universal Love, appears to be designed to function like a sun," said Sylvia. "It is designed to envelop the Universe with light and with the warmth of our love for our universal humanity. It becomes out-flowing and ever expanding. I see a universal marriage unfolding where the specific form of a people's relationship to one-another no longer matters, where the form of relationships gives way to the principles of respect for one-another as human beings, to honor kindness, generosity, and love in its highest sense, to uplift civilization and make the world in which we live a richer and brighter place."

"Are you saying that by embracing this natural universal marriage platform, we can step away from the threshold of no return and find a way to rescue our civilization?" Alejo replied. "We could have an accidentally unfolding nuclear war tomorrow."

"I think that would be the doom of mankind for all times to come," I interjected, "as it would destroy the chief resource for our needed Ice Age Renaissance. A large, highly developed, and economically well functioning society is required for starting that renaissance. If this resource is destroyed, it's game over for mankind. We are certainly justified to call today's preparation for nuclear war, suicidal insanity. Unfortunately, nuclear war is what society is after. We are like the people in the kingdom who thought that their darkness is light, and their self-enslavement is the mark of freedom." 

"The Cold War has been well named," said Maria-Ilona. "We have become stone cold towards one-another, and ourselves as a society that calls itself human beings. But how do we change the ending of Peter's story of the king who saw no hope, and could find no one to write the new songs of love and freedom that needed to be written? Considering how precarious our present world situation is, we might have already stepped past the point of no return to where a rescue of ourselves is no longer possible."

I told everybody that this very question about the threshold of no return had already been asked in ancient times. One finds traces of it in the earliest Scriptures. I referred to the Abraham story in which Abraham argued this very point in a dialog with God. The argument was about the impending destruction of the cities of Sodom and Gomorra. God suggested to Abraham that if fifty 'righteous' people could be found in these cities, the cities and the societies in them would survive. Abraham wasn't that optimistic. He suggested to God, that if perhaps only twenty upright people were to be found, would that not suffice? God agreed that this might be sufficient. Abraham asked again, what if there were only ten? God agreed again that this might possibly suffice. As it was, those ten didn't exist and the cities were self-destroyed. The societies within them had lost their conditioning to survive.

In another town in this same general era, this time in Massachusetts, a woman had slipped on an icy street and fallen. According to the doctors she had suffered a spinal injury, which they said would become fatal. As her situation worsened, and she seemed near the end of her days, she began to reason about the nature of universal principles. She reasoned that the healing works of Christ Jesus couldn't have been miracles, since miracles don't happen in the real world. So she reasoned that they must have resulted from the operation of universal principles that caused the massive healing work to be possible that Christ Jesus had accomplished so long ago. She reasoned that if this was the case, which it obviously was, then the same principles would be still as valid in her time as they had been eighteen centuries earlier.

The remarkable thing was, that while she reasoned along these lines, she found herself suddenly well. She was healed on the spot, on the very day that her minister had figured would be her last. The minister had seen her in the morning that day, in a hopeless state, and had promised to return after his service to prepare her for her death. When he returned, she was up and about, completely well, and opened the door for him.

She devoted her life from that time on to discovering and exploring the science of the principles and processes that had caused her healing, which she later called, Christian Science.

The woman lived for another forty-four years," said Maria-Ilona. "She wrote a textbook about the science that she created, and set up a college for teaching the discovered principles of scientific mental healing. The process became widely practiced by many people in healing others. The woman also created a church to promote her created healing practice. Historians also tell us that she set a portion of each day aside for the healing of the ills of the world.

"That woman was the woman in the carriage that had been seen by the paralyzed woman who was healed that day in the flow of a deeply embracing love," said Maria-Ilona. "In fact, so great was her love for mankind that she gave up her beloved country home at her homestead outside the small town, at the age of eighty-six, and moved to Boston to launch a newspaper with the mission to "bless all mankind and to injure none." However, more profoundly than this accomplishment was the rarely recognized fact that when the woman died in December 1910, she left behind a world that had been at peace for over forty years for the first time in centuries, corresponding to the period of her healing practice beginning in 1866. All the wars and long standing atrocities had ended at this time, including the American Civil War, and the British Opium Wars against China. Even the religious wars against humanity by the ecclesiastical Inquisition, which had reigned since the 1400s with terror, torture, and burning people to death, had come to an end just prior to this time. The train of atrocities and war did not get restarted until a few years after her death, beginning around the start of World War I. Nor has the train stopped rolling since."

Alejo shook his head in disbelief at the ending of Maria-Ilona's story. "You must be mistaken," he said to her.

I intervened and told him that Maria-Ilona was right about the historic timing. I confirmed that the only major period of peace between 1510 and the present, occurred during the period that Maria-Ilona had mentioned. "From 1510 onward, the world had been subjected to a continuous state of war," I said in defense of Maria-Ilona. "It began with the League of Cambrai aiming to wipe out the Venetian Empire. The Empire retaliated with staging an atrocious religious war that wiped out the Golden Renaissance. The retaliation became a string of wars that culminated into the Thirty Years War that ended only with the dawn of the Second Renaissance built on the Treaty of Westphalia. The founding of the USA came out of this background. But even at this time, while Europe celebrated its new achievement of peace and its profound renaissance, the Spanish Inquisition still ravished the human landscape and darkened the face of civilization, though to a lesser degree, for a few short years. Also the world saw a new series of wars erupting in the shadow of the 1688 invasion of England, by the Dutch Prince William of Orange, who brought the Venetian imperial system to Britain. Out of that erupted the British imperial war to deny America's independence, followed by the imperials' Jacobean terror operations in France, followed in turn by the Napoleonic Wars that wrecked Europe, and a string of smaller attacks on America culminating in the American Civil War. But the entire train of war-madness stopped around 1866. The Civil War had ended the year before. The Opium Wars against China had ended. Even the Spanish Inquisition had been finally abolished a few years earlier. No major wars ravished the world from 1866 on, until World War I erupted in 1914 and brought to an end almost a half a century of peace. At this point all hell broke loose again, and the wars haven't stopped since."

"World War I started a few years after the woman's death," said Maria-Ilona. "History tells us that the train of atrocities against mankind had been halted for the period in which the kind of love for mankind that the woman represented, was put on the table. Peter is right. The train of atrocities was restarted and put onto the fast track. Right after that, beginning with World War I, the war-train was rolling, and it hasn't stopped since. I am not saying with that, that the woman in my story was responsible for that remarkable period of peace. I merely find it remarkable that this historic coincidence exists between the woman's profound love based on scientific principles, and its expression in a period of profound mental healing in many parts of the world, with all that coming together into a remarkable period of peace that interrupted a five hundred-year period of war and inhumanity.

"The coincidence of these three historic occurrences tells me that a principle is involved in all that," said Maria-Ilona, "and that therefore the ending of my story has not yet been written. The story says something to me about the power of Love as an awesome impetus that can shape human history in a profound way. It also tells me that the train of atrocities against mankind can be stopped again, once society dedicates itself to the task of developing a loving that is as wide as the world, because the Principle of Universal Love, which Peter has mentioned, is a timeless principle. Nor do we need another pioneer in the world to demonstrate this principle for us. One demonstration is enough, because we have the capacity to carry the process forward by ourselves. I would say that my story is the answer that the king in Peter's story was looking for, which no one could give him, since the principles hadn't been discerned at the time. I also think that our dancing in the Temple of Unrequited Love has something to do with this process, because it seems to have a healing and enriching effect on our love for one-another. That's what I think is also the ending for the story of our present world that will yet be written," said Maria-Ilona.

Naturally, I applauded her. Sylvia and Alejo joined me.

"Let me tell you an even bigger story," said Sylvia and began to grin. "This story pales all the stories that were told here tonight. This story is so big that it is absolutely unbelievable. It is a gigantic story. It is so big that it contains the answer to all the other stories that were told tonight. And the most amazing part is that it is the story of just a single day, and this day is today."

With this, Sylvia began to tell her side of the story of our struggles that began with the thunderstorm in the morning. She touched on everything, including her escape to the gallery and what followed there.
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